Trump calls Elizabeth Warren ‘total fraud’ after Native American DNA test results

Trump calls Elizabeth Warren ‘total fraud’ after Native American DNA test results

President Donald Trump, in a series of tweets Tuesday, demanded that Sen. Elizabeth Warren apologize for claiming she had Native American heritage and called the results of her DNA test “bogus” and “useless.”

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Trump has repeatedly mocked Warren by calling her “Pocahontas.”

“Now that her claims of being of Indian heritage have turned out to be a scam and a lie, Elizabeth Warren should apologize for perpetrating this fraud against the American Public. Harvard called her “a person of color” (amazing con), and would not have taken her otherwise!” Trump said in a tweet.

“Pocahontas (the bad version), sometimes referred to as Elizabeth Warren, is getting slammed. She took a bogus DNA test and it showed that she may be 1/1024, far less than the average American. Now Cherokee Nation denies her, ‘DNA test is useless.’ Even they don’t want her. Phony!” the president continued.

Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. responded to Warren’s DNA results in a tweet, saying she was “undermining tribal interests” with her claims of heritage.

Shortly after Warren released her DNA test results, she took to Twitter to ask Trump about the $1 million he promised to donate to charity if she proved her Native American ancestry.

“By the way, @realDonaldTrump: Remember saying on 7/5 that you’d give $1M to a charity of my choice if my DNA showed Native American ancestry? I remember – and here’s the verdict. Please send the check to the National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center,” Warren tweeted.

On Monday, Trump denied making that claim and said he would only give her the money he promised on the campaign trail if he could administer the DNA test himself.

“That will not be something I enjoy doing either,” Trump said.

Warren’s DNA results revealed the vast majority of her ancestry is European. But it strongly supported the existence of an unadmixed Native American ancestor in her pedigree from six to 10 generations ago.

The Massachusetts senator first provided the test results to The Boston Globe on Sunday. The test was conducted by Carlos D. Bustamante, a Stanford University professor and an expert in DNA analysis.

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Trump suggests ‘rogue killers’ involved in Saudi journalist’s disappearance

Trump suggests ‘rogue killers’ involved in Saudi journalist’s disappearance

President Donald Trump told reporters that “rogue killers” may be involved in the disappearance of independent journalist Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi citizen who has been living in the U.S.

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The president’s comments Monday morning came after he spoke to Saudi Arabia’s King Salman, who, Trump said, “denies any knowledge” about Khashoggi’s disappearance.

“The king firmly denied any knowledge of it,” Trump said to the press after his phone call with the Saudi king. “He didn’t really know, maybe, I don’t want to get into his mind but it sounded to me like maybe these could have been rogue killers, who knows?”

Pressed on whether he believed King Salman’s denials, the president wouldn’t say.

“All I can do is report what he told me. He told me in a very firm way that they had no knowledge of it. He said it very strongly,” Trump said. “His denial to me could not have been stronger, that he had no knowledge. It sounded like he and also the crown prince [Mohanmmed bin Salman] had no knowledge.”

Trump also said that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is leaving “literally within an hour” for Saudi Arabia, and possibly other countries.

Khashoggi, a self-exiled Saudi journalist and prominent critic of the Saudi crown prince, was last seen entering the Saudi consulate in Turkey on Oct. 2 to obtain documents he needed to get married. Turkish authorities have claimed he was murdered in the consulate by Saudi operatives, an allegation the Saudi government has consistently denied.

Tensions grew over the weekend between Washington, Turkey and Saudi Arabia over the disappearance of Khashoggi, who was a contributor to The Washington Post.

President Trump in a “60 Minutes” interview that aired over the weekend said of the alleged murder, “There’s something really terrible and disgusting about that if that were the case. So we’re going to have to see. We’re going to get to the bottom of it, and there will be severe punishment” if the Turkish claims are true.

In an apparent response to Trump’s comments, a Saudi official said that if any moves were taken against the kingdom, “it will respond with greater action … The Kingdom’s economy has an influential and vital role in the global economy,” Reuters reported.

Trump’s comments Monday came as Saudi officials and Turkish investigators were conducting a joint inspection of the Saudi consulate in Istanbul for clues to Khashoggi’s whereabouts, The Associated Press reported.

Saudi officials arrived in Turkey on Friday after the two governments agreed to a joint investigation into the case, with Saudi officials granting Turkish investigator access to the consulate building, Reuters reported.

ABC News’ Alexander Mallin and Engin Bas contributed to this story.

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Arizonans see ‘vital’ Senate race as referendum on Trump

Arizonans see ‘vital’ Senate race as referendum on Trump

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A colorful primary, a negative ad blitz, national attention and early voting have all been a part of the Arizona Senate race.

But up until now, there’s been one missing piece: a debate.

The two candidates who are vying to win the open Senate seat, Democrat Kyrsten Sinema and Republican Martha McSally, are finally set to square off Monday night in Phoenix in the only confirmed debate between the two in this race.

PHOTO: In this Aug. 28, 2018, file photo, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., talks to campaign volunteers at a Democratic campaign office in Phoenix.AP
In this Aug. 28, 2018, file photo, Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., talks to campaign volunteers at a Democratic campaign office in Phoenix.

Squabbling between the parties over the number of debates — Sinema asked for two and McSally’s team agreed to just one — and the congressional calendar that kept the candidates, who are both current members of Congress, in Washington led to the debate being set for Oct. 15, just 22 days before Election Day and five days after early voting started in the state.

Airworthy polling in the race has been limited, but most put the result either within the margin of error or have Sinema with a slight lead, which appears to be shocking McSally.

“The fact that she’s even in the running is just like ridiculous honestly at this point,” McSally said to supporters gathered ahead of a door-knocking event Saturday in Phoenix.

The comment comes after a string of old quotes by Sinema were shared publicly throughout the week, including one where she appears to call Arizonans “crazy,” and another where she likened the Copper State to a “meth lab of democracy.” She and her team have written the quotes off as being taken out of context and the latest instances of McSally and Republicans looking to focus on negative smears rather than the issues.

For Republicans, it’s key to hold on to the seat that is currently held by Republican Sen. Jeff Flake, who decided not to run for re-election.

PHOTO: Pictured (L-R) are Rep. Kyrsten Sinema on Aug. 21, 2018 and Rep. Martha McSally on Oct. 3, 2018, in Phoenix.Matt York/AP, FILE
Pictured (L-R) are Rep. Kyrsten Sinema on Aug. 21, 2018 and Rep. Martha McSally on Oct. 3, 2018, in Phoenix.

George Bingham is a Republican from Arizona who was handing out McSally posters at a rally held for her with Mitt Romney in Gilbert on Friday. Bingham said that he sees this as a “huge, huge election” that has implications that extend far beyond Arizona.

“We have a president that needs all the Republican support that he can get in the Senate,” Bingham said.

“If he wants to get his agenda done, he’s going to need every Republican senator,” he said.

Another Arizona Republican, Scott Weinberg, said that he saw the recent hearings for Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, where Flake played a telling role in approving the judge’s recommendation from the Senate Judiciary Committee, as a clear example of why Republicans need to hold on to the seat.

“I think it’s super important given what we just saw with the Kavanaugh confirmation. Things have gotten so cut-throat in D.C. It’s risen to a new level I think that’s just one more vote that we’re going to have to hopefully we can maintain the majority in the Senate,” Weinberg told ABC News at a “Get Out The Vote” event in Phoenix Saturday.

PHOTO: Sen. Jeff Flake speaks during an appearance at the Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit, Oct. 1, 2018, in Boston. Mary Schwalm/AP, FILE
Sen. Jeff Flake speaks during an appearance at the Forbes 30 Under 30 Summit, Oct. 1, 2018, in Boston.

Democrats, however, see the possible flip of the seat from red to blue as a way to thwart Trump and slow down or stop the implementation of his agenda.

Pam Potter, a college professor who was knocking on doors in Peoria on behalf of Democratic candidates, including Sinema, said she thinks this Senate race is one of the “really important” ones this cycle.

“Right now, we have a president unchecked. Right now they [Republicans] have all the houses,” Potter said.

“Kyrsten specifically is a moderate Democrat. She is ready to work on the issues rather than a partisan stance,” she added.

PHOTO: Rep. Martha McSally along with former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, right, answers questions from the media during a Get Out the Vote Rally at the Gilbert Falls Event Center in Gilbert, Ariz., Oct. 12, 2018.Darryl Webb/AP
Rep. Martha McSally along with former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney, right, answers questions from the media during a Get Out the Vote Rally at the Gilbert Falls Event Center in Gilbert, Ariz., Oct. 12, 2018.

“In many respects, she is the best replacement for John McCain in that she is willing to put the good of the people ahead of ideology,” she said of the longtime Arizona Republican who passed away in August.

Rina Parisi was a registered Republican for her “entire life” before switching after the 2016 election. She said that she is supporting Sinema in this “vital” Senate race because she feels she fits what she sees as the evolving nature of Arizona.

“The demographics here are changing and I don’t think we have the representation of what the demographics are today,” said Parisi, who knows Sinema personally having had the congresswoman as an instructor at Arizona State University. “We’re no longer the Wild West. We have people from all over the country. It’s not just ranchers who only see each other when they go into town for groceries. We need someone who can represent a population that is diverse and I think Kyrsten is the embodiment of diversity.

“The thing that impressed me about her: how well she listens. She cares, and she does the extra footwork for individuals,” Parisi said while attending an Arizona Democratic Party volunteer event.

Given the close nature of the race and the Senate headcount, it’s no surprise that it is attracting national attention. It’s sure to be thrust into the spotlight later in the week as well, as the Trump campaign announced this weekend that the president will be coming to Mesa for a rally on Oct. 19 as part of a “western swing.”

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Nikki Haley resigns as UN ambassador, will leave at end of the year, Trump says

Nikki Haley resigns as UN ambassador, will leave at end of the year, Trump says

President Donald Trump announced that Nikki Haley has resigned as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and will be leaving her post at the end of the year.

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During a meeting in the Oval Office on Tuesday, Trump said that while he is sorry to see Haley go, she had told him in advance that she wanted to take a break after having served for two years helping advance the administration’s foreign policy agenda. Haley also reportedly told her staff that she intended to resign, according to one State Department source.

“She’s done a fantastic job and we’ve done a fantastic job together,” Trump said during the meeting with the outgoing ambassador on Tuesday. “We’re all happy for you in one way, but we hate to lose you.”

PHOTO: U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at a press briefing at U.N. headquarters in New York, July 20, 2018.Brendan McDermid/Reuters, FILE
U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at a press briefing at U.N. headquarters in New York, July 20, 2018.

Haley pointed to accomplishments over the past two years ranging from talks with North Korea about denuclearization, improving dialogue with Russia, moving the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, and taking a harder line with Iran. She added that she relished going into meetings with foreign leaders with “body armor every day to defend America.”

PHOTO: U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley addresses the General Assembly prior to the vote on Jerusalem, Dec. 21, 2017, at U.N. Headquarters in New York.
SLIDESHOW: United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley

“It has been an honor of a lifetime,” Haley said. “Now the United States is respected. Countries might not like what we do, but they respect what we do. Now if we say we’re going to do something, we follow through…whether it’s the chemical weapons in Syria, whether it’s with NATO and other countries have to pay their share, whether it’s the trade deals, which has been amazing. They get that the president means business and we follow through with that.”

Haley’s departure brings her career with the Trump administration on the world stage full circle.

In the Republican response to the 2016 State of the Union address, she urged members of her party to resist following the “angriest voices,” which was seen as a subtle jab at Trump, even though she didn’t refer to him by name.

In December, she famously told countries critical of America’s decision to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem that “the US will be taking names” of countries who vote in favor of a U.N. resolution criticizing the move.

At the UN we’re always asked to do more & give more. So, when we make a decision, at the will of the American ppl, abt where to locate OUR embassy, we don’t expect those we’ve helped to target us. On Thurs there’ll be a vote criticizing our choice. The US will be taking names. pic.twitter.com/ZsusB8Hqt4

— Nikki Haley (@nikkihaley) December 19, 2017

By the time of her last high-profile appearance at the United Nations General Assembly in September, when she appeared alongside President Trump, she had earned a reputation among world leaders as a someone who would promote American foreign policy but also serve as a moderating voice in the room.

PHOTO: President Donald Trump talks to Nikki Haley, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, at the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Sept. 24, 2018.Evan Vucci/AP, FILE
President Donald Trump talks to Nikki Haley, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, at the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Sept. 24, 2018.

Haley has been the UN ambassador since January 2017. Prior to that, she served as the Governor of South Carolina – a role she became famous for when she called for the Confederate battle flag to be removed from the State House in the wake of the deadly shooting in a historic African American church in Charleston.

Long rumored as a potential presidential candidate, Haley shot down that speculation and said she planned to campaign for the president during his re-election effort. She echoed that pledge in her resignation letter, a missive which was dated Oct. 3, and which ABC News has obtained.

“I will once again become a private citizen,” Haley wrote of her life after her U.N. post tenure ends. “I expect to continue to speak out from time to time on important public policy matters, but I will surely not be a candidate for any office in 2020. As a private citizen, I look forward to supporting your re-election as President and supporting the policies that will continue to move our great country toward even greater heights.”

With Haley’s resignation, she joins the list of Trump administration officials to leave after less than two years in office.

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