Image from page 899 of “A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians” (1904)

Image from page 899 of “A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians” (1904)
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Identifier: practicaltreatis1904muss2
Title: A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Musser, John Herr, 1856-1912 Pancoast, Henry
Subjects: Diagnosis Diagnosis, Radioscopic Diagnosis
Publisher: Philadelphia and New York : Lea
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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n pressure, whereas in pleurodyniafirm pressure is grateful, though tapping is painful. In torticollis the head is drawn to one side and fixed in that position.The sternomastoid especially is rigid and tender on pinching. In spinalaffections the head is retracted, and there are antecedent symptoms, asheadache and darting pains with fever. In rheumatism of the abdominal muscles the pain may be so acute asto_ simulate peritonitis. The surface pain of hysteria which gives rise toso-called hysterical peritonitis/ simulating true peritonitis and rheuma-tism, may be noted. 828 CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. Rhachitis. In this affection the size of the body is lessened. For its recognitionit is important to know how rapidly the osseous deposits in childhoodhave formed. The fontanelles and the epiphyses must be examined. Ifthe fontanelles are open after the normal time of closure, or if the epiph-yses are enlarged and lack firmness, the condition points either to simplemalnutrition or to rhachitis.

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Rhachitis: attitude in sitting; one hand raisedto exhibit swelling at the wrist. (Williams.) Rhachitis in moderate degree in a boy agedfifteen months; showing backward excurva-tion of the spine. (Williams.) Rhachitis usually develops in childhood, and is most common in chil-dren with unfavorable hygienic surroundings, who have lived upon astarchy diet and have taken cows milk for too long a period of time.A child that has been nursed during the mothers pregnancy is apt tohave the disease. In rhachitis late development of the teeth is observed. If the ribs areexamined, nodules will be detected at the junction of the bone with thecartilage. These may be seen, as well as felt, if the child is thin. Theyform the so-called rhachitic rosary. The thorax also is changed in shape.At the junction of the cartilages and ribs a depression takes place whichis continuous with a groove passing out from the ensiform cartilagetoward the axilla. This transverse curve is known as Harrisons groove.It may

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Image from page 698 of “The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics” (1896)

Image from page 698 of “The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics” (1896)
Lemon Mousse Cups
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Identifier: bostoncookingsch19hill_4
Title: The Boston Cooking School magazine of culinary science and domestic economics
Year: 1896 (1890s)
Authors: Hill, Janet McKenzie, 1852-1933, ed Boston Cooking School (Boston, Mass.)
Subjects: Home economics Cooking
Publisher: Boston : Boston Cooking-School Magazine
Contributing Library: Boston Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Public Library

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lemon, and boil twoor three minutes. Select small, ripebananas. Peel them, remove thecoarse threads, and, if too large for asingle service, cut them in halves, cross-wise. Roll the bananas in the coldsyrup, and then in chopped nuts, cover-ing them completely with the syrupand the nuts. Any kind of nuts or amixture of nuts may beused. English walnuts orpecan nuts are good. Dis-pose the bananas on heartleaves of lettuce. Put alittle dressing on each, andsprinkle the dressing withbits of candied cherries. Vegetable Macedoine Mousse or plate in a kettle with a flat bottom,to prevent contact, then put in thecans, separating them from each otherwith a folded cloth. Fill kettle not Dressing for Banana-and-Nut SaladPut three tablespoon-fuls of butter, the beatenyolks of four eggs, one-fourth a teaspoonful ofsalt, a dash of paprika,and about a tablespoonful of lemonjuice in a small saucepan. Set thedish over hot water, and stir vigorouslyuntil the mixture thickens. When Seasonable Recipes 487

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cold and ready to serve, beat the dress- Pour this over two cups of grateding into one-third a cup of double cream, bread crumbs (do not measure thebeaten solid. crumbs too lightly) and one cup of Rice Timbalewith PreservedRaspberriesPut one cup ofrice and a quart ofcold water over thefire, and bringquickly to theboiling-point. Letboil five minutes.Then drain, andrinse in cold water.To the blanchedrice add a quart ofmilk and a tea-spoonful of salt, and let cook until therice is tender, adding more milk, ifneeded. Then add the grated rind ofan orange or a teaspoonful of vanillaextract, and one-fourth a cup, each,of butter, sugar, and :cream. Whenthoroughly mixed, beat in the whitesof two eggs, beaten dry, and turn intoa timbale mould, thoroughly butteredand dredged with sugar. Press therice into the mould, to fill it closely.Then set, on several folds of paper ina pan of hot water, intothe oven for about tenminutes. Let stand tocool and settle amoment. Then turnonto a serving-dish.Pour

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Image from page 899 of “A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians” (1904)

Image from page 899 of “A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians” (1904)
School closures
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: practicaltreatis1904muss2
Title: A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Musser, John Herr, 1856-1912 Pancoast, Henry
Subjects: Diagnosis Diagnosis, Radioscopic Diagnosis
Publisher: Philadelphia and New York : Lea
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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n pressure, whereas in pleurodyniafirm pressure is grateful, though tapping is painful. In torticollis the head is drawn to one side and fixed in that position.The sternomastoid especially is rigid and tender on pinching. In spinalaffections the head is retracted, and there are antecedent symptoms, asheadache and darting pains with fever. In rheumatism of the abdominal muscles the pain may be so acute asto_ simulate peritonitis. The surface pain of hysteria which gives rise toso-called hysterical peritonitis/ simulating true peritonitis and rheuma-tism, may be noted. 828 CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. Rhachitis. In this affection the size of the body is lessened. For its recognitionit is important to know how rapidly the osseous deposits in childhoodhave formed. The fontanelles and the epiphyses must be examined. Ifthe fontanelles are open after the normal time of closure, or if the epiph-yses are enlarged and lack firmness, the condition points either to simplemalnutrition or to rhachitis.

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Rhachitis: attitude in sitting; one hand raisedto exhibit swelling at the wrist. (Williams.) Rhachitis in moderate degree in a boy agedfifteen months; showing backward excurva-tion of the spine. (Williams.) Rhachitis usually develops in childhood, and is most common in chil-dren with unfavorable hygienic surroundings, who have lived upon astarchy diet and have taken cows milk for too long a period of time.A child that has been nursed during the mothers pregnancy is apt tohave the disease. In rhachitis late development of the teeth is observed. If the ribs areexamined, nodules will be detected at the junction of the bone with thecartilage. These may be seen, as well as felt, if the child is thin. Theyform the so-called rhachitic rosary. The thorax also is changed in shape.At the junction of the cartilages and ribs a depression takes place whichis continuous with a groove passing out from the ensiform cartilagetoward the axilla. This transverse curve is known as Harrisons groove.It may

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Image from page 899 of “A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians” (1904)

Image from page 899 of “A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians” (1904)
School closures
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: practicaltreatis1904muss2
Title: A practical treatise on medical diagnosis for students and physicians
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Musser, John Herr, 1856-1912 Pancoast, Henry
Subjects: Diagnosis Diagnosis, Radioscopic Diagnosis
Publisher: Philadelphia and New York : Lea
Contributing Library: Francis A. Countway Library of Medicine
Digitizing Sponsor: Open Knowledge Commons and Harvard Medical School

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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n pressure, whereas in pleurodyniafirm pressure is grateful, though tapping is painful. In torticollis the head is drawn to one side and fixed in that position.The sternomastoid especially is rigid and tender on pinching. In spinalaffections the head is retracted, and there are antecedent symptoms, asheadache and darting pains with fever. In rheumatism of the abdominal muscles the pain may be so acute asto_ simulate peritonitis. The surface pain of hysteria which gives rise toso-called hysterical peritonitis/ simulating true peritonitis and rheuma-tism, may be noted. 828 CONSTITUTIONAL DISEASES. Rhachitis. In this affection the size of the body is lessened. For its recognitionit is important to know how rapidly the osseous deposits in childhoodhave formed. The fontanelles and the epiphyses must be examined. Ifthe fontanelles are open after the normal time of closure, or if the epiph-yses are enlarged and lack firmness, the condition points either to simplemalnutrition or to rhachitis.

Text Appearing After Image:
Rhachitis: attitude in sitting; one hand raisedto exhibit swelling at the wrist. (Williams.) Rhachitis in moderate degree in a boy agedfifteen months; showing backward excurva-tion of the spine. (Williams.) Rhachitis usually develops in childhood, and is most common in chil-dren with unfavorable hygienic surroundings, who have lived upon astarchy diet and have taken cows milk for too long a period of time.A child that has been nursed during the mothers pregnancy is apt tohave the disease. In rhachitis late development of the teeth is observed. If the ribs areexamined, nodules will be detected at the junction of the bone with thecartilage. These may be seen, as well as felt, if the child is thin. Theyform the so-called rhachitic rosary. The thorax also is changed in shape.At the junction of the cartilages and ribs a depression takes place whichis continuous with a groove passing out from the ensiform cartilagetoward the axilla. This transverse curve is known as Harrisons groove.It may

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Image from page 67 of “The first Belgian hare course of instruction. Twenty lessons. Complete directions for buying, sheltering, feeding, breeding … developing a business, etc. … with a true history of the Belgian hare ..” (1901)

Image from page 67 of “The first Belgian hare course of instruction. Twenty lessons. Complete directions for buying, sheltering, feeding, breeding … developing a business, etc. … with a true history of the Belgian hare ..” (1901)
The New England Pasty
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Identifier: firstbelgianhare00crab
Title: The first Belgian hare course of instruction. Twenty lessons. Complete directions for buying, sheltering, feeding, breeding … developing a business, etc. … with a true history of the Belgian hare ..
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Crabtree, Pleasant Elijah New England Belgian Hare Company Rice, Elmer Cook, 1868-
Subjects: Belgian hare
Publisher: Boston, New England, New England Belgian Hare Company
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

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ndlet the dish containing it stay only a short time in the hutch,so as not to absorb foul odors. Milk takes up foulness quickerthan Avater. Scald and keep scrupulously clean all feedingdishes used for milk. LINSEED MEAL—An excellent condiment is made as fol-lows: Take one pound of linseed meal which has been 50 CRABTREES INSTRUCTIONS crushed in its own oil and mix it thoroughly with eight poundsof any other good mea), say barley or corn, together with oneounce of gentian, one ounce of nitre and two ounces of aniseed.Mix with water into thick, damp (but not sloppy) paste, andfeed twice a day, giving each time as much as they will eat,removing what they leave as soon as their appetites are sated.This condiment is a tonic, makes their coats glossy andsmooth, clears their kidneys, produces milk and gives a goodappetite. PEAS—Uncooked peas are a good flesh-producing food.Use always the gray peas, not the white ones. The dung ofBelgians fed on white peas is pasty and foul. Continued use

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GRAIN AND WATKR DISHES, OF EARTHENWARE. of the white peas will result in diarrhoea. The gray peasshould be covered with water for a day and a night, thenrinsed with fresh water, drained and set away to remain untilthey begin to sprout. Then they may be fed, a handful toeach Belgian, night and morning. OATS—These are a staple article of diet. CARROTS—An excellent food. They are fed uncooked.They are especially good when the doe is suckling her young,as they aid the secretion of milk. HAY—Clean clover, or timothy, or alfalfa (common in Oal-ifoimia, Texas and the Southwest) are good foods. Put a HOW TO FEED 51 bunch in the hay rack right and morning. BREWERS GRAINS—Thoroughly dry them and mix withmeal of some kind. The sugar in them helps to fatten.Dont feed too many, or they will sour on the stomach. BRAN—Use little of this^ as it does not have much nour-ishment. It may be mixed with meal. RICE—Should be boiled and allowed to stand until it iscold and with the least amount o

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