Nikki Haley’s Surprise Resignation | The Daily Show

After Nikki Haley resigns as the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., speculation begins about who will replace her.

Subscribe to The Daily Show:
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwWhs_6x42TyRM4Wstoq8HA/?sub_confirmation=1

Follow The Daily Show:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TheDailyShow
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thedailyshow
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thedailyshow

Watch full episodes of The Daily Show for free: http://www.cc.com/shows/the-daily-show-with-trevor-noah/full-episodes

Follow Comedy Central:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/ComedyCentral
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ComedyCentral
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/comedycentral

About The Daily Show:
Trevor Noah and The World’s Fakest News Team tackle the biggest stories in news, politics and pop culture.

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah airs weeknights at 11/10c on Comedy Central.
Video Rating: / 5

Alyssa Milano attends Kavanaugh hearing to ‘show my solidarity for Dr. Ford’

Alyssa Milano attends Kavanaugh hearing to ‘show my solidarity for Dr. Ford’

Actress Alyssa Milano showed her “solidarity” for Dr. Christine Blasey Ford Thursday as the professor faced questions from members of the Senate Judiciary Committee after accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault.

Interested in Supreme Court?

Add Supreme Court as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Supreme Court news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

“I felt like I needed to be here to show my solidarity for Dr. Ford,” Milano said from the hearing room. “On this day that will be very difficult for her.”

Milano traveled from Los Angeles to the nation’s capital to be present for the historic hearing.

Milano has been an outspoken #MeToo activist for almost a year now and was among the first to tweet out her powerful #MeToo story, inspiring hundreds of other women to also come forward.

PHOTO: Actress Alyssa Milano hugs Rep. Carolyn Maloney in the hearing room prior to the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.Tom Williams/Pool/EPA via Shutterstock
Actress Alyssa Milano hugs Rep. Carolyn Maloney in the hearing room prior to the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.

Milano, who sat in the middle of the hearing room, said she was a guest of California Senator Dianne Feinstein.

While Ford answered questions about how Kavanaugh and his friend Mark Judge, whom she also accused of the alleged assault, laughed while attacking her, Milano was spotted in the hearing room in tears, dabbing her eyes with a tissue.

Kavanaugh and Judge have denied assaulting Ford.

Milano recalls being “almost 20” when she was watching the 1991 Anita Hill hearings.

“I remember thinking what a strong, amazing, solid woman she was to come forward,” Milano recalled of the woman who accused Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment. “What a service she was doing for all women.”

PHOTO: Actress Alyssa Milano talks to media before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.Pool via AFP/Getty Images
Actress Alyssa Milano talks to media before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.

More than two decades after the Hill hearings, which concluded with Thomas being confirmed onto the Supreme Court, Milano says “We are in a different time.”

“Women are standing together now in solidarity,” she said.

PHOTO: Christine Blasey Ford, the woman accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her at a party 36 years ago, testifies during his U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Christine Blasey Ford, the woman accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her at a party 36 years ago, testifies during his U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.

After Kavanaugh testified, Milano slammed what she sees as a double standard between men and women, tweeting: “I will say this…if a woman were to yell, interrupt and cry while being questioned, people would call her unhinged or say she had a melt down.”

ABC News’ Trish Turner contributed to this report.

Read More

Alyssa Milano attends Kavanaugh hearing to ‘show my solidarity for Dr. Ford’

Alyssa Milano attends Kavanaugh hearing to ‘show my solidarity for Dr. Ford’

Actress Alyssa Milano showed her “solidarity” for Dr. Christine Blasey Ford Thursday as the professor faced questions from members of the Senate Judiciary Committee after accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexual assault.

Interested in Supreme Court?

Add Supreme Court as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Supreme Court news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

“I felt like I needed to be here to show my solidarity for Dr. Ford,” Milano said from the hearing room. “On this day that will be very difficult for her.”

Milano traveled from Los Angeles to the nation’s capital to be present for the historic hearing.

Milano has been an outspoken #MeToo activist for almost a year now and was among the first to tweet out her powerful #MeToo story, inspiring hundreds of other women to also come forward.

PHOTO: Actress Alyssa Milano hugs Rep. Carolyn Maloney in the hearing room prior to the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.Tom Williams/Pool/EPA via Shutterstock
Actress Alyssa Milano hugs Rep. Carolyn Maloney in the hearing room prior to the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh on Capitol Hill in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.

Milano, who sat in the middle of the hearing room, said she was a guest of California Senator Dianne Feinstein.

While Ford answered questions about how Kavanaugh and his friend Mark Judge, whom she also accused of the alleged assault, laughed while attacking her, Milano was spotted in the hearing room in tears, dabbing her eyes with a tissue.

Kavanaugh and Judge have denied assaulting Ford.

Milano recalls being “almost 20” when she was watching the 1991 Anita Hill hearings.

“I remember thinking what a strong, amazing, solid woman she was to come forward,” Milano recalled of the woman who accused Clarence Thomas of sexual harassment. “What a service she was doing for all women.”

PHOTO: Actress Alyssa Milano talks to media before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.Pool via AFP/Getty Images
Actress Alyssa Milano talks to media before the Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to be an associate justice of the Supreme Court in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.

More than two decades after the Hill hearings, which concluded with Thomas being confirmed onto the Supreme Court, Milano says “We are in a different time.”

“Women are standing together now in solidarity,” she said.

PHOTO: Christine Blasey Ford, the woman accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her at a party 36 years ago, testifies during his U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images
Christine Blasey Ford, the woman accusing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her at a party 36 years ago, testifies during his U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing in Washington, Sept. 27, 2018.

ABC News’ Trish Turner contributed to this report.

Read More

Omarosa carefully addresses Trump filing in ‘Daily Show’ interview

Omarosa carefully addresses Trump filing in ‘Daily Show’ interview

Omarosa Manigault Newman addressed a legal filing by the Trump campaign — sort of — as she continued her book tour for “Unhinged” on Tuesday night with an appearance on “The Daily Show with Trevor Noah.”

Manigault, who has spent the past two days plugging her book while also releasing secret audio recordings made during her time in the White House, was hesitant to talk too much about the arbitration.

“As of today, Donald Trump has decided to sue me or bring litigation against me to silence me and to not allow me to tell my story,” she told told host Noah. “I just have a whole host of attorneys who are telling me to not give Trump the ammunition.”

The Trump campaign, Donald J. Trump for President, Inc., filed arbitration against the reality TV star on Tuesday morning in New York for allegations that she violated her non-disclosure agreement with the campaign by releasing tapes she recorded of her firing by Chief of Staff John Kelly, a subsequent conversation with Trump himself, and a 2016 discussion with campaign aides about the candidate’s possible use of the N-word.

Manigault told MSNBC on Tuesday afternoon, after the administration filed the arbitration, “I don’t believe that I have violated, but I will leave it to the lawyers to sort it out.”

Most of her conversation with Noah centered on the content of the recordings or the need to make them at all. Manigault said she felt like she needed to tape conversations to protect herself, she said.

Former White House staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in New York.AP
Former White House staffer Omarosa Manigault Newman speaks during an interview with The Associated Press, Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, in New York.

“I knew I had to cover my back and document what I saw as an opportunity to kind of blow the whistle on a lot of the corruption going on in the White House, and I knew that I needed to document that corruption, otherwise people would not take it seriously,” Manigault said.

Manigault, who rose to prominence and befriended the president on his show, “The Apprentice,” said she wanted to be a billionaire just like Trump — and she was blinded by the loyalty in joining the administration.

“I wanted to lead one of his companies. He inspired me. I wanted to be a billionaire,” she told Noah. “I grew up in the Westlake projects [in Youngstown, Ohio] and I wanted to be wealthy and that’s who I thought I could aspire to be, but boy has he been a great disappointment. And because I did have this blind spot and was blindly loyal, and I looked like the biggest dummy following this person because I didn’t have that same perspective. And sometimes you have to step back in order to get a clear view, and I recognized that I was going down the wrong path with Trump.”

ABC News’ Chad Murray contributed to this report.

Read More

Dick Van Dyke, Herbie Faye, The Dick Van Dyke Show, “One Angry Man,” 1962

Dick Van Dyke, Herbie Faye, The Dick Van Dyke Show, “One Angry Man,” 1962
Call Me By Your Name Cast
Image by classic_film
"The Dick Van Dyke Show"
Season 1, Episode 26: "One Angry Man"
Original TV broadcast of episode: March 7, 1962

Summary, via IMDb:
Rob gets called for jury duty. Unbeknownst to Rob, Laura attends the trial. The defendant is an exotic dancer. Is she really innocent as only Rob believes? Is Rob going to be in a lot of trouble when he gets home?

Guest stars in this episode included Sue Ane Langdon, Herbie Faye, Patsy Kelly, Herb Vigran, Lee Bergere, Dabbs Greer, Howard Wendell, and Doodles Weaver.

Carl Reiner’s brilliant sitcom brainchild, "The Dick Van Dyke Show," ran from 1961 through 1966. The American show was nominated for a number of Emmys and won 15, as well as winning several Golden Globes and other awards. The classic, sophisticated comedy show revolved around the New York work life and home life of TV comedy writer Rob Petrie, and starred TV newcomer Dick Van Dyke (b. December 13, 1925). Others in the stellar cast were Mary Tyler Moore (December 29, 1936 – January 25, 2017), Rose Marie (b. August 15, 1923), Morey Amsterdam (December 14, 1980 – October 28, 1996), Richard Deacon (May 14, 1921 – August 8, 1984), Larry Mathews (b. August 15, 1955), Jerry Paris (July 25, 1925 – March 31, 1986), Ann Morgan Guilbert (October 16, 1928 – June 14, 2016), and Carl Reiner (b. March 20, 1922). In 2002, the show was ranked at 13 on "TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time" and in 2013, it was ranked at 20 on their list of the 60 Best Series. The show was produced by Reiner with Bill Persky and Sam Denoff. Earle Hagen composed the music for the show’s memorable opening theme.

Some trivia about the show and its actors, via IMDb:
Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore played a married couple so convincingly on the show that many viewers actually thought they were married in real life. They did in fact become very close – "like siblings", as Dick Van Dyke said – and both admit they had crushes on each other while the show was in production. They have remained close friends ever since.
 
A small controversy occurred because of Mary Tyler Moore wearing Capri pants on the show. Up until the show’s premiere, most housewives were seen on TV in dresses, but Moore’s explanation was that most of the housewives she knew wore pants. The network was against this at first, and said that she had to be in a skirt for a certain number of scenes per episode. To fight this, they filmed a scene where Laura walked into the kitchen in Capri pants and came out a second later in a skirt. The network finally relented. Because of Moore, Capri pants became a huge fashion craze in the early 1960’s.
 
For the first three seasons of the show, Alan Brady’s face was never seen, but his voice was occasionally heard, because Carl Reiner wanted to get a big star to play Alan. Reiner eventually decided to take on the role himself as the newest on-screen star.
 
Dick Van Dyke took a big chance agreeing to do this show because in order to do it, he had to leave the Broadway hit show "Bye Bye Birdie" for which he won a Tony Award. If the show was not a hit, he would have been out of work.
 
The show’s pilot was created by Carl Reiner and was highly autobiographical. CBS executives decided that the main character was too Jewish, too intellectual, and too New York and cast Dick Van Dyke instead of Reiner.
 
The show’s production company was called Calvada Productions. The name came from the names of all of the key persons involved in production: Carl Reiner (C-A), Sheldon Leonard (L), Dick Van Dyke (V-A), and Danny Thomas (D-A). In the episode "Big Max Calvada," co-producer Leonard played the character role of "Big Max Calvada".
 
"The Dick Van Dyke Show: My Blonde-Haired Brunette" (1961) (when Laura dyed her hair blonde, temporarily) was the ninth episode filmed during the first season, but it was the second episode to be aired, because Carl Reiner was so impressed with Mary Tyler Moore’s rapid development that he wanted to highlight her in an episode as soon as possible. He had thoughts of it being the series’ debut.
 
Carl Reiner and the other writers were very careful not to use any 1960’s slang in the show’s scripts. In fact, references to any time period or current events are very few and far between.
 
The character of Sally Rogers, played by Rose Marie, was inspired by Lucille Kallen (who wrote for "Your Show of Shows" (1950), and Selma Diamond (who wrote for "Caesar’s Hour" (1954). Rose Marie was meant to be the female star of the show, but Mary Tyler Moore surprised everyone by becoming the breakout star, bigger than even Dick Van Dyke.
 
Three episodes were filmed without a live audience. First, was "The Bad Old Days" (1962) originally televised on Wednesday, April 4, 1962. It used extra sped-up filmed inserts during Rob’s dream of a 1920s lifestyle, which made shooting in front of an audience impractical. Second was "Happy Birthday and Too Many More" (1964), because the cast were grieving after the assassination of Pres. John F. Kennedy in Dallas Texas, on Friday, November 22, 1963. The third one was "The Gunslinger" (1966), which was filmed on location without a live audience.
 
According to Dick Van Dyke, viewers used to make bets (during the opening credits of seasons 2, 3, 4, & 5) on whether or not Rob Petrie would stumble over the ottoman when walking through the door of his house. A third variation on the tripping-on-the-ottoman opening was added in later seasons, wherein Van Dyke neither stumbles over nor skips around it, but trips on a corner attempting to do the latter, and recovers without falling.
 
After "The Dick Van Dyke Show," composer Earle Hagen also wrote the theme songs for three others. In order, they are "Gomer Pyle: USMC" (1964), "That Girl" (1966), and "Mod Squad" (1968).
 
Carl Reiner would often ask cast and crew members about funny things that had happened to them, then he would write whole episodes about these occurrences. As a result, a majority of the episodes over the course of the show’s five season run were based on actual events that really occurred.
 
CBS canceled the show after season one temporarily, then renewed it. When the show finally did go off the air, it was because the cast and producers wanted to quit while they were still proud of it. Additional fact, Carl Reiner personally said at the very beginning, that the show would not run for more than five seasons.

**************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).