Angry voters, a risky Parliament and the same old problems … will Morrison find a way out?

Angry voters, a risky Parliament and the same old problems … will Morrison find a way out?

Posted

October 22, 2018 07:50:05

Fittingly, given the perennial instability of federal politics, the Wentworth byelection looked clear-cut on Saturday night only to become very murky on Sunday morning.

But as things stand, although a lot of postals are still outstanding, independent Kerryn Phelps is expected to take the seat and the Coalition is poised to go into minority government, and potentially to descend into yet more infighting on the way to seemingly inevitable defeat next year.

In Wentworth Ms Phelps’s support appears to have strengthened late. She improved her messaging, while the Government’s shambles last week reinforced in voters’ minds why it needed a walloping.

Disgusted with coup culture

Regardless of the narrowing in the count, the top line message is that these voters shouted their outrage at the political assassination of Malcolm Turnbull.

They also strongly signalled they cared about climate change and were not satisfied at the Government’s policy response; as well, they want something done about the offshore refugees who have been treated inhumanely for so long.

Defenders of the leadership switch will say Wentworth isn’t Australia, voters elsewhere won’t feel so strongly, and Scott Morrison cuts through better than Malcolm Turnbull.

But a large number of Australians are disgusted with the expedient coup culture that has overtaken our politics.

As Liberal candidate Dave Sharma told Sky on Sunday, “Australians are sick of this [instability]”.

The Coalition can’t avoid paying a price for that at the election — the question is only how high a price.

Basic lessons unlearnt

To think that the Nationals could be even remotely contemplating a coup by Barnaby Joyce against Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack shows that some politicians find it hard to learn the most basic lessons.

Mr McCormack is lacklustre but cutting him down would be simply to court danger.

Not least, some rural women are so against Mr Joyce that the party might face active opposition from them.

Yet, Nationals sources still don’t rule out a move before Christmas.

Shining a light on familiar problems

As for Mr Morrison, as much as bringing him new problems, Wentworth has put up in lights the ones that were already there.

Even if those in other electorates are not as agitated about climate change as Wentworthians, that issue is more important to the broad Australian community than it is to the Government.

Mr Morrison may have held the line against the right wing Liberals arguing for quitting the Paris agreement but he errs by brushing away people’s concerns about climate change with his single-minded focus on power prices. Many voters won’t see that approach as adequate.

He remains wedged between his Liberal right-wing ideologues and mainstream voters. The right claims to speak for the “mainstream” on climate (and other things) but it doesn’t.

Mr Morrison needs a way out — to show that he understands a more sophisticated policy is required — but none is in sight.

Liberal deputy leader Josh Frydenberg was holding firmly to present policies on Sunday, even though he has previously admitted his bitter disappointment at the death of the National Energy Guarantee, which in its totality integrated energy and climate policy.

The story is a little more positive on the refugees. Finally, the Government shows a willingness to settle some in New Zealand, but it demands that Labor pass the legislation to close the “back door” to stop these people (and boat people settled elsewhere) ever setting foot in Australia.

Labor says such a ban is too wide but the pressure is on for a deal. One “push” factor is that progress on a New Zealand solution, albeit partial, would take some weight off Bill Shorten at Labor’s December national conference.

Dutton may be nervous

A hung parliament, assuming it happens, will make everything harder for the Government, including building a platform for the election.

To pass any controversial legislation, it would have to get the support of at least one of six crossbenchers. The crossbenchers will exploit their enhanced importance.

Generally, risks will be higher. The possibility of a successful no confidence motion is remote. But Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton might be a little more nervous about the chances of his eligibility to sit in Parliament being referred to the High Court.

The Government’s worsened situation may impose more discipline on its backbenchers — or it may encourage backbench grandstanding in the pursuit of survival.

A hiding to nothing

Coming up on the policy front is the issue of the response to the religious freedom report.

Here Mr Morrison is on a hiding to nothing. His right wing wants more religions protections to be legislated. But in the run up to Wentworth he had to promise legislation to remove the existing right of religious schools to discriminate against gay students — and he is resisting calls to do the same for teachers.

The religious freedom debate is going in quite another direction to that foreseen by the right and Mr Morrison himself.

Mr Morrison would do better to simply bury the (still unreleased) report. But the right won’t allow that.

Then there is the Middle East policy U-turn Mr Morrison put on the table in the campaign’s last week — to consider shifting the Australian embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. A decision is due by year’s end. Is Mr Morrison going to stick to this controversial path — or make an ungainly retreat? Either way, there’ll be a fresh argument.

Turnbull’s legacy up in the air

After the Wentworth debacle Mr Turnbull’s critics predictably are intensifying their attack on him — firstly for jumping ship ahead of the election and secondly for his failure to intervene to help Mr Sharma.

Both Mr Morrison and Mr Sharma appealed personally to Mr Turnbull to come to the aid of the party.

Mr Turnbull can say he made it clear he would quit Parliament if rolled, and that ex-PMs shouldn’t hang about.

The former prime minister can argue that weighing into the campaign would have been viewed cynically and thus counterproductive.

If, however, Mr Sharma misses out by a relatively modest margin, the question will hang in the air: might Mr Turnbull have swung a few votes?

His decisions will be seen even by some of his supporters on the negative side of his legacy ledger.

Michelle Grattan is a professorial fellow at the University of Canberra and chief political correspondent at The Conversation, where this article first appeared.

Topics:

government-and-politics,

politics-and-government,

federal-government,

elections,

federal-parliament,

australia

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Dick Van Dyke, Herbie Faye, The Dick Van Dyke Show, “One Angry Man,” 1962

Dick Van Dyke, Herbie Faye, The Dick Van Dyke Show, “One Angry Man,” 1962
Call Me By Your Name Cast
Image by classic_film
"The Dick Van Dyke Show"
Season 1, Episode 26: "One Angry Man"
Original TV broadcast of episode: March 7, 1962

Summary, via IMDb:
Rob gets called for jury duty. Unbeknownst to Rob, Laura attends the trial. The defendant is an exotic dancer. Is she really innocent as only Rob believes? Is Rob going to be in a lot of trouble when he gets home?

Guest stars in this episode included Sue Ane Langdon, Herbie Faye, Patsy Kelly, Herb Vigran, Lee Bergere, Dabbs Greer, Howard Wendell, and Doodles Weaver.

Carl Reiner’s brilliant sitcom brainchild, "The Dick Van Dyke Show," ran from 1961 through 1966. The American show was nominated for a number of Emmys and won 15, as well as winning several Golden Globes and other awards. The classic, sophisticated comedy show revolved around the New York work life and home life of TV comedy writer Rob Petrie, and starred TV newcomer Dick Van Dyke (b. December 13, 1925). Others in the stellar cast were Mary Tyler Moore (December 29, 1936 – January 25, 2017), Rose Marie (b. August 15, 1923), Morey Amsterdam (December 14, 1980 – October 28, 1996), Richard Deacon (May 14, 1921 – August 8, 1984), Larry Mathews (b. August 15, 1955), Jerry Paris (July 25, 1925 – March 31, 1986), Ann Morgan Guilbert (October 16, 1928 – June 14, 2016), and Carl Reiner (b. March 20, 1922). In 2002, the show was ranked at 13 on "TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time" and in 2013, it was ranked at 20 on their list of the 60 Best Series. The show was produced by Reiner with Bill Persky and Sam Denoff. Earle Hagen composed the music for the show’s memorable opening theme.

Some trivia about the show and its actors, via IMDb:
Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore played a married couple so convincingly on the show that many viewers actually thought they were married in real life. They did in fact become very close – "like siblings", as Dick Van Dyke said – and both admit they had crushes on each other while the show was in production. They have remained close friends ever since.
 
A small controversy occurred because of Mary Tyler Moore wearing Capri pants on the show. Up until the show’s premiere, most housewives were seen on TV in dresses, but Moore’s explanation was that most of the housewives she knew wore pants. The network was against this at first, and said that she had to be in a skirt for a certain number of scenes per episode. To fight this, they filmed a scene where Laura walked into the kitchen in Capri pants and came out a second later in a skirt. The network finally relented. Because of Moore, Capri pants became a huge fashion craze in the early 1960’s.
 
For the first three seasons of the show, Alan Brady’s face was never seen, but his voice was occasionally heard, because Carl Reiner wanted to get a big star to play Alan. Reiner eventually decided to take on the role himself as the newest on-screen star.
 
Dick Van Dyke took a big chance agreeing to do this show because in order to do it, he had to leave the Broadway hit show "Bye Bye Birdie" for which he won a Tony Award. If the show was not a hit, he would have been out of work.
 
The show’s pilot was created by Carl Reiner and was highly autobiographical. CBS executives decided that the main character was too Jewish, too intellectual, and too New York and cast Dick Van Dyke instead of Reiner.
 
The show’s production company was called Calvada Productions. The name came from the names of all of the key persons involved in production: Carl Reiner (C-A), Sheldon Leonard (L), Dick Van Dyke (V-A), and Danny Thomas (D-A). In the episode "Big Max Calvada," co-producer Leonard played the character role of "Big Max Calvada".
 
"The Dick Van Dyke Show: My Blonde-Haired Brunette" (1961) (when Laura dyed her hair blonde, temporarily) was the ninth episode filmed during the first season, but it was the second episode to be aired, because Carl Reiner was so impressed with Mary Tyler Moore’s rapid development that he wanted to highlight her in an episode as soon as possible. He had thoughts of it being the series’ debut.
 
Carl Reiner and the other writers were very careful not to use any 1960’s slang in the show’s scripts. In fact, references to any time period or current events are very few and far between.
 
The character of Sally Rogers, played by Rose Marie, was inspired by Lucille Kallen (who wrote for "Your Show of Shows" (1950), and Selma Diamond (who wrote for "Caesar’s Hour" (1954). Rose Marie was meant to be the female star of the show, but Mary Tyler Moore surprised everyone by becoming the breakout star, bigger than even Dick Van Dyke.
 
Three episodes were filmed without a live audience. First, was "The Bad Old Days" (1962) originally televised on Wednesday, April 4, 1962. It used extra sped-up filmed inserts during Rob’s dream of a 1920s lifestyle, which made shooting in front of an audience impractical. Second was "Happy Birthday and Too Many More" (1964), because the cast were grieving after the assassination of Pres. John F. Kennedy in Dallas Texas, on Friday, November 22, 1963. The third one was "The Gunslinger" (1966), which was filmed on location without a live audience.
 
According to Dick Van Dyke, viewers used to make bets (during the opening credits of seasons 2, 3, 4, & 5) on whether or not Rob Petrie would stumble over the ottoman when walking through the door of his house. A third variation on the tripping-on-the-ottoman opening was added in later seasons, wherein Van Dyke neither stumbles over nor skips around it, but trips on a corner attempting to do the latter, and recovers without falling.
 
After "The Dick Van Dyke Show," composer Earle Hagen also wrote the theme songs for three others. In order, they are "Gomer Pyle: USMC" (1964), "That Girl" (1966), and "Mod Squad" (1968).
 
Carl Reiner would often ask cast and crew members about funny things that had happened to them, then he would write whole episodes about these occurrences. As a result, a majority of the episodes over the course of the show’s five season run were based on actual events that really occurred.
 
CBS canceled the show after season one temporarily, then renewed it. When the show finally did go off the air, it was because the cast and producers wanted to quit while they were still proud of it. Additional fact, Carl Reiner personally said at the very beginning, that the show would not run for more than five seasons.

**************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Dick Van Dyke, Herbie Faye, The Dick Van Dyke Show, “One Angry Man,” 1962

Dick Van Dyke, Herbie Faye, The Dick Van Dyke Show, “One Angry Man,” 1962
Call Me By Your Name Cast
Image by classic_film
"The Dick Van Dyke Show"
Season 1, Episode 26: "One Angry Man"
Original TV broadcast of episode: March 7, 1962

Summary, via IMDb:
Rob gets called for jury duty. Unbeknownst to Rob, Laura attends the trial. The defendant is an exotic dancer. Is she really innocent as only Rob believes? Is Rob going to be in a lot of trouble when he gets home?

Guest stars in this episode included Sue Ane Langdon, Herbie Faye, Patsy Kelly, Herb Vigran, Lee Bergere, Dabbs Greer, Howard Wendell, and Doodles Weaver.

Carl Reiner’s brilliant sitcom brainchild, "The Dick Van Dyke Show," ran from 1961 through 1966. The American show was nominated for a number of Emmys and won 15, as well as winning several Golden Globes and other awards. The classic, sophisticated comedy show revolved around the New York work life and home life of TV comedy writer Rob Petrie, and starred TV newcomer Dick Van Dyke (b. December 13, 1925). Others in the stellar cast were Mary Tyler Moore (December 29, 1936 – January 25, 2017), Rose Marie (b. August 15, 1923), Morey Amsterdam (December 14, 1980 – October 28, 1996), Richard Deacon (May 14, 1921 – August 8, 1984), Larry Mathews (b. August 15, 1955), Jerry Paris (July 25, 1925 – March 31, 1986), Ann Morgan Guilbert (October 16, 1928 – June 14, 2016), and Carl Reiner (b. March 20, 1922). In 2002, the show was ranked at 13 on "TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time" and in 2013, it was ranked at 20 on their list of the 60 Best Series. The show was produced by Reiner with Bill Persky and Sam Denoff. Earle Hagen composed the music for the show’s memorable opening theme.

Some trivia about the show and its actors, via IMDb:
Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore played a married couple so convincingly on the show that many viewers actually thought they were married in real life. They did in fact become very close – "like siblings", as Dick Van Dyke said – and both admit they had crushes on each other while the show was in production. They have remained close friends ever since.
 
A small controversy occurred because of Mary Tyler Moore wearing Capri pants on the show. Up until the show’s premiere, most housewives were seen on TV in dresses, but Moore’s explanation was that most of the housewives she knew wore pants. The network was against this at first, and said that she had to be in a skirt for a certain number of scenes per episode. To fight this, they filmed a scene where Laura walked into the kitchen in Capri pants and came out a second later in a skirt. The network finally relented. Because of Moore, Capri pants became a huge fashion craze in the early 1960’s.
 
For the first three seasons of the show, Alan Brady’s face was never seen, but his voice was occasionally heard, because Carl Reiner wanted to get a big star to play Alan. Reiner eventually decided to take on the role himself as the newest on-screen star.
 
Dick Van Dyke took a big chance agreeing to do this show because in order to do it, he had to leave the Broadway hit show "Bye Bye Birdie" for which he won a Tony Award. If the show was not a hit, he would have been out of work.
 
The show’s pilot was created by Carl Reiner and was highly autobiographical. CBS executives decided that the main character was too Jewish, too intellectual, and too New York and cast Dick Van Dyke instead of Reiner.
 
The show’s production company was called Calvada Productions. The name came from the names of all of the key persons involved in production: Carl Reiner (C-A), Sheldon Leonard (L), Dick Van Dyke (V-A), and Danny Thomas (D-A). In the episode "Big Max Calvada," co-producer Leonard played the character role of "Big Max Calvada".
 
"The Dick Van Dyke Show: My Blonde-Haired Brunette" (1961) (when Laura dyed her hair blonde, temporarily) was the ninth episode filmed during the first season, but it was the second episode to be aired, because Carl Reiner was so impressed with Mary Tyler Moore’s rapid development that he wanted to highlight her in an episode as soon as possible. He had thoughts of it being the series’ debut.
 
Carl Reiner and the other writers were very careful not to use any 1960’s slang in the show’s scripts. In fact, references to any time period or current events are very few and far between.
 
The character of Sally Rogers, played by Rose Marie, was inspired by Lucille Kallen (who wrote for "Your Show of Shows" (1950), and Selma Diamond (who wrote for "Caesar’s Hour" (1954). Rose Marie was meant to be the female star of the show, but Mary Tyler Moore surprised everyone by becoming the breakout star, bigger than even Dick Van Dyke.
 
Three episodes were filmed without a live audience. First, was "The Bad Old Days" (1962) originally televised on Wednesday, April 4, 1962. It used extra sped-up filmed inserts during Rob’s dream of a 1920s lifestyle, which made shooting in front of an audience impractical. Second was "Happy Birthday and Too Many More" (1964), because the cast were grieving after the assassination of Pres. John F. Kennedy in Dallas Texas, on Friday, November 22, 1963. The third one was "The Gunslinger" (1966), which was filmed on location without a live audience.
 
According to Dick Van Dyke, viewers used to make bets (during the opening credits of seasons 2, 3, 4, & 5) on whether or not Rob Petrie would stumble over the ottoman when walking through the door of his house. A third variation on the tripping-on-the-ottoman opening was added in later seasons, wherein Van Dyke neither stumbles over nor skips around it, but trips on a corner attempting to do the latter, and recovers without falling.
 
After "The Dick Van Dyke Show," composer Earle Hagen also wrote the theme songs for three others. In order, they are "Gomer Pyle: USMC" (1964), "That Girl" (1966), and "Mod Squad" (1968).
 
Carl Reiner would often ask cast and crew members about funny things that had happened to them, then he would write whole episodes about these occurrences. As a result, a majority of the episodes over the course of the show’s five season run were based on actual events that really occurred.
 
CBS canceled the show after season one temporarily, then renewed it. When the show finally did go off the air, it was because the cast and producers wanted to quit while they were still proud of it. Additional fact, Carl Reiner personally said at the very beginning, that the show would not run for more than five seasons.

**************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Dick Van Dyke, Herbie Faye, The Dick Van Dyke Show, “One Angry Man,” 1962

Dick Van Dyke, Herbie Faye, The Dick Van Dyke Show, “One Angry Man,” 1962
Call Me By Your Name Cast
Image by classic_film
"The Dick Van Dyke Show"
Season 1, Episode 26: "One Angry Man"
Original TV broadcast of episode: March 7, 1962

Summary, via IMDb:
Rob gets called for jury duty. Unbeknownst to Rob, Laura attends the trial. The defendant is an exotic dancer. Is she really innocent as only Rob believes? Is Rob going to be in a lot of trouble when he gets home?

Guest stars in this episode included Sue Ane Langdon, Herbie Faye, Patsy Kelly, Herb Vigran, Lee Bergere, Dabbs Greer, Howard Wendell, and Doodles Weaver.

Carl Reiner’s brilliant sitcom brainchild, "The Dick Van Dyke Show," ran from 1961 through 1966. The American show was nominated for a number of Emmys and won 15, as well as winning several Golden Globes and other awards. The classic, sophisticated comedy show revolved around the New York work life and home life of TV comedy writer Rob Petrie, and starred TV newcomer Dick Van Dyke (b. December 13, 1925). Others in the stellar cast were Mary Tyler Moore (December 29, 1936 – January 25, 2017), Rose Marie (b. August 15, 1923), Morey Amsterdam (December 14, 1980 – October 28, 1996), Richard Deacon (May 14, 1921 – August 8, 1984), Larry Mathews (b. August 15, 1955), Jerry Paris (July 25, 1925 – March 31, 1986), Ann Morgan Guilbert (October 16, 1928 – June 14, 2016), and Carl Reiner (b. March 20, 1922). In 2002, the show was ranked at 13 on "TV Guide’s 50 Greatest TV Shows of All Time" and in 2013, it was ranked at 20 on their list of the 60 Best Series. The show was produced by Reiner with Bill Persky and Sam Denoff. Earle Hagen composed the music for the show’s memorable opening theme.

Some trivia about the show and its actors, via IMDb:
Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore played a married couple so convincingly on the show that many viewers actually thought they were married in real life. They did in fact become very close – "like siblings", as Dick Van Dyke said – and both admit they had crushes on each other while the show was in production. They have remained close friends ever since.
 
A small controversy occurred because of Mary Tyler Moore wearing Capri pants on the show. Up until the show’s premiere, most housewives were seen on TV in dresses, but Moore’s explanation was that most of the housewives she knew wore pants. The network was against this at first, and said that she had to be in a skirt for a certain number of scenes per episode. To fight this, they filmed a scene where Laura walked into the kitchen in Capri pants and came out a second later in a skirt. The network finally relented. Because of Moore, Capri pants became a huge fashion craze in the early 1960’s.
 
For the first three seasons of the show, Alan Brady’s face was never seen, but his voice was occasionally heard, because Carl Reiner wanted to get a big star to play Alan. Reiner eventually decided to take on the role himself as the newest on-screen star.
 
Dick Van Dyke took a big chance agreeing to do this show because in order to do it, he had to leave the Broadway hit show "Bye Bye Birdie" for which he won a Tony Award. If the show was not a hit, he would have been out of work.
 
The show’s pilot was created by Carl Reiner and was highly autobiographical. CBS executives decided that the main character was too Jewish, too intellectual, and too New York and cast Dick Van Dyke instead of Reiner.
 
The show’s production company was called Calvada Productions. The name came from the names of all of the key persons involved in production: Carl Reiner (C-A), Sheldon Leonard (L), Dick Van Dyke (V-A), and Danny Thomas (D-A). In the episode "Big Max Calvada," co-producer Leonard played the character role of "Big Max Calvada".
 
"The Dick Van Dyke Show: My Blonde-Haired Brunette" (1961) (when Laura dyed her hair blonde, temporarily) was the ninth episode filmed during the first season, but it was the second episode to be aired, because Carl Reiner was so impressed with Mary Tyler Moore’s rapid development that he wanted to highlight her in an episode as soon as possible. He had thoughts of it being the series’ debut.
 
Carl Reiner and the other writers were very careful not to use any 1960’s slang in the show’s scripts. In fact, references to any time period or current events are very few and far between.
 
The character of Sally Rogers, played by Rose Marie, was inspired by Lucille Kallen (who wrote for "Your Show of Shows" (1950), and Selma Diamond (who wrote for "Caesar’s Hour" (1954). Rose Marie was meant to be the female star of the show, but Mary Tyler Moore surprised everyone by becoming the breakout star, bigger than even Dick Van Dyke.
 
Three episodes were filmed without a live audience. First, was "The Bad Old Days" (1962) originally televised on Wednesday, April 4, 1962. It used extra sped-up filmed inserts during Rob’s dream of a 1920s lifestyle, which made shooting in front of an audience impractical. Second was "Happy Birthday and Too Many More" (1964), because the cast were grieving after the assassination of Pres. John F. Kennedy in Dallas Texas, on Friday, November 22, 1963. The third one was "The Gunslinger" (1966), which was filmed on location without a live audience.
 
According to Dick Van Dyke, viewers used to make bets (during the opening credits of seasons 2, 3, 4, & 5) on whether or not Rob Petrie would stumble over the ottoman when walking through the door of his house. A third variation on the tripping-on-the-ottoman opening was added in later seasons, wherein Van Dyke neither stumbles over nor skips around it, but trips on a corner attempting to do the latter, and recovers without falling.
 
After "The Dick Van Dyke Show," composer Earle Hagen also wrote the theme songs for three others. In order, they are "Gomer Pyle: USMC" (1964), "That Girl" (1966), and "Mod Squad" (1968).
 
Carl Reiner would often ask cast and crew members about funny things that had happened to them, then he would write whole episodes about these occurrences. As a result, a majority of the episodes over the course of the show’s five season run were based on actual events that really occurred.
 
CBS canceled the show after season one temporarily, then renewed it. When the show finally did go off the air, it was because the cast and producers wanted to quit while they were still proud of it. Additional fact, Carl Reiner personally said at the very beginning, that the show would not run for more than five seasons.

**************
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).