Image from page 86 of “The student’s France, a history of France from the earliest times to the establishment of the second empire in 1852” (1870)

Image from page 86 of “The student’s France, a history of France from the earliest times to the establishment of the second empire in 1852” (1870)
map quest france
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: studentsfrancehi01jerv
Title: The student’s France, a history of France from the earliest times to the establishment of the second empire in 1852
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: Jervis, W. H. (William Henley), 1813-1883
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Harper & brothers
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
xtinguished, the sovereignty of that coun-try devolved on Charlemagne. Another extensive province wasthus annexed, without striking a blow, to his empire. This con-quest was almost immediately followed by the subjugation of thekingdom of the Avars, the descendants of those dreaded Hunswho had desolated Europe in the fifth century. The Avars hadtaken part in the machinations of Tassilo, but had been forcedback into their forests and morasses in Pannonia. They werenow in dangerous proximity to the Bavarian frontier, and Charle-magne resolved upon their conquest. In 791 he invaded theircountry with an overwhelming force in three great divisions. Inthe first campaign the Franks carried by assault the outermostof a series of immense circular intrenchments called rings,which protected the royal residence of the Avars, and, after cap-turing a multitude of prisoners and a rich booty, made themselvesmasters of western Pannonia. In 796, Pepin, king of Italy, at MAP OF THE EMPIRE OF CHARLEMAGNE.

Text Appearing After Image:
The double dotted line :::::::;::: markb the boundaries of Oliarleaunyaed empire. 70 CHARLEMAGNE. Chai-. v. the head of n, vast combined forca of Franks, Lombards, Bava-rians, and other Germans, stormed in succession all the remain-ii-jg fortifications of the Huns, penetrated to the palace of theirIJiacan, pillaged and burnt it, and compelled the whole nation,thinned by terrible slaughter, to submit at discretion. In theirlast strong-hold the Huns had accumulated a prodigious treasure,acquired by their repeated plunder both of the Eastern and West-ern empires; the whole, fabulous in value, was now appropriatedby the Franks. The Avar chieftain Thudan, and his principalfollowers, consented to embrace the Gospel, and were baptized atAix-la-Chapelle. § 9. The sphere of Charlemagnes dominion, when it had reach-ed its widest development, comprehended at least half the Euro-pean continent, and all the richer and more important territoriesof the ancient Roman empire. His sceptre was obeyed f

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 86 of “The student’s France, a history of France from the earliest times to the establishment of the second empire in 1852” (1870)

Image from page 86 of “The student’s France, a history of France from the earliest times to the establishment of the second empire in 1852” (1870)
map quest france
Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: studentsfrancehi01jerv
Title: The student’s France, a history of France from the earliest times to the establishment of the second empire in 1852
Year: 1870 (1870s)
Authors: Jervis, W. H. (William Henley), 1813-1883
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Harper & brothers
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: The Library of Congress

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
xtinguished, the sovereignty of that coun-try devolved on Charlemagne. Another extensive province wasthus annexed, without striking a blow, to his empire. This con-quest was almost immediately followed by the subjugation of thekingdom of the Avars, the descendants of those dreaded Hunswho had desolated Europe in the fifth century. The Avars hadtaken part in the machinations of Tassilo, but had been forcedback into their forests and morasses in Pannonia. They werenow in dangerous proximity to the Bavarian frontier, and Charle-magne resolved upon their conquest. In 791 he invaded theircountry with an overwhelming force in three great divisions. Inthe first campaign the Franks carried by assault the outermostof a series of immense circular intrenchments called rings,which protected the royal residence of the Avars, and, after cap-turing a multitude of prisoners and a rich booty, made themselvesmasters of western Pannonia. In 796, Pepin, king of Italy, at MAP OF THE EMPIRE OF CHARLEMAGNE.

Text Appearing After Image:
The double dotted line :::::::;::: markb the boundaries of Oliarleaunyaed empire. 70 CHARLEMAGNE. Chai-. v. the head of n, vast combined forca of Franks, Lombards, Bava-rians, and other Germans, stormed in succession all the remain-ii-jg fortifications of the Huns, penetrated to the palace of theirIJiacan, pillaged and burnt it, and compelled the whole nation,thinned by terrible slaughter, to submit at discretion. In theirlast strong-hold the Huns had accumulated a prodigious treasure,acquired by their repeated plunder both of the Eastern and West-ern empires; the whole, fabulous in value, was now appropriatedby the Franks. The Avar chieftain Thudan, and his principalfollowers, consented to embrace the Gospel, and were baptized atAix-la-Chapelle. § 9. The sphere of Charlemagnes dominion, when it had reach-ed its widest development, comprehended at least half the Euro-pean continent, and all the richer and more important territoriesof the ancient Roman empire. His sceptre was obeyed f

Note About Images
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.